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Archive for November, 2005

PHOTOS: Lviv (left) and Truskavets (below, right).

Sarita finally went on a much-needed break on the second week of October after months of serious ministry work — not without her ever reliable backpack, of course.

She reports: “I had a good rest and got to recharge batteries. I went to the cities in the northwestern part of Ukraine. I immensely enjoyed the old architectural wonders of two of the oldest cities of Ukraine, Lviv and Truskavets! I also enjoyed the feel of being there.”

The people in Lviv and Truskavets, Sarita shares, speak Ukrainian and not Russian. “But they do understand Russian, of course, but they will reply to your Russian lines in Ukrainian,” Sarita shares with much amusement.

This tough mountaineer also hied off to the Carpathian Mountains, a well-known place for trekking in northwestern Ukraine.

“You can actually hike or trek from there to Poland!” she exclaims. “I wish I had the time to do it. Maybe I will one day, who knows?”

Sarita observes that in the Carpathian Mountains, the people speak another language — sort of a cross between Ukrainian and a mixed set of Slovakian, Polish, Hungarian, and Romanian all rolled into one.

“Amazing, isn’t it?” she says with a smile. “I was wondering how I understood this unique language at all, considering that I was there on my own!” adds Sarita who speaks Russian (she started to study the language in March 2005).

“It was really an interesting linguistic experience. I felt like I was in a different country while there in the Carpathian Mountains, or even Lviv. I’m glad I went to those places,” says Sarita.

While visiting these wonderful places, Sarita met some interesting people whom she found to be warm and friendly. She recounts a particular incident wherein she met a girl on a train en route to Lviv city.

 “Her name is Yrina. Interestingly, she speaks English. We got to talk while on the train on my way to Lviv. She helped me find an Internet café, and I asked her if she wanted to have coffee with me the next day. She happily said ‘yes.’  She’s a busy young lady, being a psychologist and a worker in a publishing house where she oversees a group of people who transcribe some articles or journals for newspaper publication. But her main job is to translate Ukrainian articles into German and vice versa. She’s more fluent in German than English, and she wanted to practise her English with me,” shares Sarita.

Yrina and Sarita did meet the next day after their initial meeting. The former was so excited to see Sarita. They walked around the center of Lviv, and went inside a coffee bar where students and young professors hang out. The place is popular among the people in the academic community.

“We talked for hours. She asked me lots of questions like what I’m doing in Ukraine and where I come from. She also asked the situation in the Philippines. Lots of questions! Hahaha! She was just so excited to learn more, and I was enjoying our chat as well. I got to share with her what God did and still is doing in my life and how I came to know Christ. She was simply all ears, always saying ‘Interesting!” as I talked about my faith,'” says Sarita.

Sarita’s new-found Ukrainian friend was amazed how God worked in and through Sarita’s life. The two parted ways reluctantly after a meaningful conversation since Sarita had to catch her train back to Donetsk and Yrina had a meeting to attend. They exchanged contact information (i.e. e-mail addresses and cell phone numbers), though.

“Up until now, we still communicate through text messages and emails which is really great. Praise God for this opportunity! She invited me to stay in her place if and when  I visit Lviv again,” adds Sarita who came back home, recharged and all revved up to resume the Lord’s work in her beloved Donetsk. (JDR)

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PHOTOS: Lviv (left) and Truskavets (below, right).

Sarita finally went on a much-needed break on the second week of October after months of serious ministry work — not without her ever reliable backpack, of course.

She reports: “I had a good rest and got to recharge batteries. I went to the cities in the northwestern part of Ukraine. I immensely enjoyed the old architectural wonders of two of the oldest cities of Ukraine, Lviv and Truskavets! I also enjoyed the feel of being there.”

The people in Lviv and Truskavets, Sarita shares, speak Ukrainian and not Russian. “But they do understand Russian, of course, but they will reply to your Russian lines in Ukrainian,” Sarita shares with much amusement.

This tough mountaineer also hied off to the Carpathian Mountains, a well-known place for trekking in northwestern Ukraine.

“You can actually hike or trek from there to Poland!” she exclaims. “I wish I had the time to do it. Maybe I will one day, who knows?”

Sarita observes that in the Carpathian Mountains, the people speak another language — sort of a cross between Ukrainian and a mixed set of Slovakian, Polish, Hungarian, and Romanian all rolled into one.

“Amazing, isn’t it?” she says with a smile. “I was wondering how I understood this unique language at all, considering that I was there on my own!” adds Sarita who speaks Russian (she started to study the language in March 2005).

“It was really an interesting linguistic experience. I felt like I was in a different country while there in the Carpathian Mountains, or even Lviv. I’m glad I went to those places,” says Sarita.

While visiting these wonderful places, Sarita met some interesting people whom she found to be warm and friendly. She recounts a particular incident wherein she met a girl on a train en route to Lviv city.

 “Her name is Yrina. Interestingly, she speaks English. We got to talk while on the train on my way to Lviv. She helped me find an Internet café, and I asked her if she wanted to have coffee with me the next day. She happily said ‘yes.’  She’s a busy young lady, being a psychologist and a worker in a publishing house where she oversees a group of people who transcribe some articles or journals for newspaper publication. But her main job is to translate Ukrainian articles into German and vice versa. She’s more fluent in German than English, and she wanted to practise her English with me,” shares Sarita.

Yrina and Sarita did meet the next day after their initial meeting. The former was so excited to see Sarita. They walked around the center of Lviv, and went inside a coffee bar where students and young professors hang out. The place is popular among the people in the academic community.

“We talked for hours. She asked me lots of questions like what I’m doing in Ukraine and where I come from. She also asked the situation in the Philippines. Lots of questions! Hahaha! She was just so excited to learn more, and I was enjoying our chat as well. I got to share with her what God did and still is doing in my life and how I came to know Christ. She was simply all ears, always saying ‘Interesting!” as I talked about my faith,'” says Sarita.

Sarita’s new-found Ukrainian friend was amazed how God worked in and through Sarita’s life. The two parted ways reluctantly after a meaningful conversation since Sarita had to catch her train back to Donetsk and Yrina had a meeting to attend. They exchanged contact information (i.e. e-mail addresses and cell phone numbers), though.

“Up until now, we still communicate through text messages and emails which is really great. Praise God for this opportunity! She invited me to stay in her place if and when  I visit Lviv again,” adds Sarita who came back home, recharged and all revved up to resume the Lord’s work in her beloved Donetsk. (JDR)

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